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To fall in the void as I fell: none of you knows what that means. For you, to fall means to plunge perhaps from the twenty-sixth floor of a skyscraper, or from an airplane which breaks down in flight: to fall headlong, grope in the air a moment, and then the Earth is immediately there, and you get a big bump. But I'm talking about the time when there wasn't any Earth underneath or anything else solid, not even a celestial body in the distance capable of attracting you into its orbit. You simply fell, indefinitely, for an indefinite length of time. I went down into the void, to the most absolute bottom conceivable, and once there I saw that the extreme limit must have been much, much farther below, very remote, and I went on falling, to reach it. Since there were no reference points, I had no idea whether my fall was fast or slow. Now that I think about it, there weren't even any proofs that I was really falling: perhaps I had always remained immobile in the same place, or I was moving in an upward direction; since there was no above or below these were only nominal questions and so I might just as well go on thinking I was falling, as I was naturally led to think. [1]

The shift from a mechanical to an information society demands new communication processes, new visual and verbal languages, and new relationships of education, practice and production. [2]

After all, information has become such a common word and is used so freely and with such ease that we should have no problem at all in defining it. We know at least two things about information: that it is the content of a communication act; and that there is something less than material about it – at least judging from the ease with which it goes from mouth to ear and ear to mouth. [3]

Cabinet for education, practice and production
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  1. Italo Calvino, Cosmicomics, 1968.
  2. Cooper, Muriel and MacNeil, Ron. Course materials from the Visible language Workshop, various dates, 1974–1985.
  3. Tiziana Terranova, Network Culture, 2004
  4. Video source: https://youtu.be/D53cLusQIf8